“What you do is your religion.”  Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970)  What I do is make textile art.  Some of what I make is specifically for liturgical or religious use.  Please click through these pages

Monticello triptych

Presbyterian, Indiana, religious art, liturgical textiles, church banner, liturgical commission

Monticello Triptych, 50" x 114". Created for 1st Presbyterian Church of Monticello, IN. In Memoriam Margaret H. Wineland, it incorporates some textiles from her collection, and was designed to complement the contemporary stained glass windows in the Chapel.

Presbyterian, Indiana, religious art, liturgical textiles, church banner, liturgical commission

The gothic arch and two side panels are separate pieces, to facilitate installation. Motifs and sheer overlays were layered over a logarithmic grid of mixed textiles, with details embroidered in gold ribbon floss.

MONTICELLO TRIPTYCH :  This piece is informed by an overall theme of water, as is appropriate for a church in “the land of lakes”.  The left-hand panel represents creation coming out of chaos per: Gen.1.2: …and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the Spirit of God was moving over the face of the waters.   and Ps.24.1-2 The earth is the Lord’s and the fulness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein; for he has founded it upon the seas and established it upon the rivers.  This panel is headed by “Xi“, the initial letter of the Greek “chaos”, and uses the schematic fish shape for the eye of G-d.

The right-hand panel represents the Flood and the threat of a return to pre-creation chaos if G-d should turn away per:  Gen.7. 11-12: …on the day all the fountains of the deep burst forth, and the windows of the heavens were opened.  And rain fell upon the earth forty days and forty nights.  This panel is headed by “Rho“, the initial letter of the Greek “rheos” (stream), and uses the fish shape as the dove.

The dominant, center panel represents Christ as fisherman per: Matt.4.19: And passing along by the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net in the sea; for they were fishermen.  And Jesus said to them, “Follow me and I will make you fishers of men. (similarly, Mark 1.17)   as well as the sacrament of baptism (from baptizo, the Greek for immersion).

The star as lower left representing the nativity and the house of David, and the cross at the upper right representing the death and sacrifice, are linked by a gold fishing net symbolising Christ’s life and ministry.  The glory of the risen Christ is suggested by the colours and rays at the very top of the arch, behind the traditional “Xi Rho“, the first two letters of “Christos”.  The fish shape is used in its usual guise as a symbol for the Christ.

Presbyterian, Indiana, religious art, liturgical textiles, church banner, liturgical commission

Detail: The Eye of God moving over the waters. Machine-stitched gold ribbon-floss.


Baptismal Vestments

Episcopalian, Indiana, religious art, liturgical textiles, church banner, liturgical commission, baptismal vestments

Set of Baptismal Vestments, Trinity Episcopal Church, Indianapolis, IN

Episcopalian, Indiana, religious art, liturgical textiles, church banner, liturgical commission, baptismal vestments

Cotton Matelisse, pigment painted, sheer applique, machine stitched gold and silver ribbon-floss


Episcopalian, Indiana, religious art, liturgical textiles, church banner, liturgical commission, baptismal vestments, stoles

cotton damask, block printed, sheer applique, machine stitched gold and silver ribbon floss


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.